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Laila Soliman’s Whims of Freedom, Cairo, 2017. Photo: Laila Woliman
Articles, Essays, Volume 7

The 1919 Revolution in the Eyes of Modern and Contemporary Egyptian Theatre Directors: A Reflection of a Generation Gap

The 1919 Revolution in the Eyes of Modern and Contemporary 
Egyptian Theatre Directors: A Reflection of a Generation Gap
By Hadia abd el-fattah Ahmed
Arab Stages, Volume 7 (Fall, 2017) 
©2017 by Martin E. Segal Theatre Center Publications

Historical Background:

In 1919, after thirty years of European occupation, the Egyptians decided to revolt against their suppressors: the British military forces. The spark started immediately after the British expelled the Egyptian national leader Saad Zaghloul, and his companions Mohammed Mahmuod, Ismail Sedki Basha and Hamad El-Basel from Egypt. When the group demanded an Egyptian representation at the Versailles Conference to defend Egypt’s right to be an independent national state, the British arrested and sent them to Malta on 9 March 1919. From that day until late April 1919, Egypt witnessed a nationwide upheaval—encouraged by the two official parties’ members that dominated Egypt at that time, Al-Hezib Al-watany (The National Party)[1] and Al-Wafd (The Delegation Party).[2]

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